At the Moving Picture Ball...

A daily walk through film history

A wonderful 4 and 1/2 minute documentary about Mr. Le Prince. Thus ends our celebration of Mr. Le Prince. Tomorrow’s filmmaker(s): The Lumiere Brothers!

Le Prince’s last film, filmed in 1888, 2 years before his mysterious disappearance. The man shown playing is Adolphe Le Prince, the son of the filmmaker, who is also featured in Roundhay Garden Scene.

A plaque in Leeds, England showing the site of Louis Le Prince’s workshop, from where “Traffic Crossing Leeds Bridge” was filmed in 1888.

Made in late October of 1888, this 2 second film shows traffic crossing the Leeds Bridge in Leeds, England. 

The Le Prince 16-lens camera, invented by Mr. Le Prince himself in New York in 1886.

The Le Prince 16-lens camera, invented by Mr. Le Prince himself in New York in 1886.

"The earliest celluloid film was shot by Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince using the Le Prince single-lens camera made in 1888. It was taken in the garden of the Whitley family house in Oakwood Grange Road, Roundhay, a suburb of Leeds, Yorkshire, Great Britain, possibly on October 14, 1888. It shows Adolphe Le Prince (Le Prince’s son), Mrs. Sarah Whitley, (Le Prince’s mother-in-law), Joseph Whitley and Miss Harriet Hartley. The ‘actors’ are shown walking around in circles, laughing to themselves and keeping within the area framed by the camera. It lasts for less than 2 seconds and includes 4 frames." -Wikipedia

“"In conclusion, I would say that Mr. Le Prince was in many ways a very extraordinary man, apart from his inventive genius, which was undoubtedly great. He stood 6ft. 3in. or 4in. (190cm) in his stockings, well built in proportion, and he was most gentle and considerate and, though an inventor, of an extremely placid disposition which nothing appeared to ruffle." - Fredric Mason, woodworker and assistant of Le Prince”

"The last remaining production of Le Prince’s 16-lens camera is a frame sequence of a man walking around a corner…. Pfend Jacques, French cinema-historian and Le Prince specialist, confirmed that those images where shot in Paris, at the corner of Rue Bochard de Saron (where Le Prince was living at the time)." 

"Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince was an inventor who shot the first moving pictures on paper film using a single lens camera. He has been heralded as the "Father of Cinematography" since 1930." -Wikipedia
Ah, Mr. Le Prince. The father of film as we know it, accredited as making the first true film, “Roundhay Garden Scene”.  Today, we celebrate his work, starting with “Man Walking Around a Corner ” from 1887, to “Accordion Player” from around 2 years before he mysteriously disappeared from a train in 1880. Stay tuned for quotes, photos, and films.

"Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince was an inventor who shot the first moving pictures on paper film using a single lens camera. He has been heralded as the "Father of Cinematography" since 1930." -Wikipedia

Ah, Mr. Le Prince. The father of film as we know it, accredited as making the first true film, “Roundhay Garden Scene”.  Today, we celebrate his work, starting with “Man Walking Around a Corner ” from 1887, to “Accordion Player” from around 2 years before he mysteriously disappeared from a train in 1880. Stay tuned for quotes, photos, and films.

Taken between 1884 and 1887, this is a collection of Eadweard Muybridge’s female photography. Call it art, pornography, whatever you see it as, but the fact cannot be denied that this is the basis for the movies as we know them.